4 Proven & Easy-to-Execute Tactics to Attract Ideal Prospects

4 Proven & Easy-to-Execute Tactics to Attract Ideal Prospects

It’s easy to get lost in the service, administrative, and compliance side your business while pushing aside the work needed to attract the ideal prospects.
 

There are simple strategies and tactics that often get started and stopped over and over. It’s a cycle of marketing misfortune. Marketing is often the weak link in an advisors practice and it’s almost always the first “expense’ that gets cut or the first “task” that falls off the plate.

Ready to learn FOUR proven and easy-to-execute tactics, plus ONE critical strategy to help you attract more ideal prospects?

1. Invite People to Your Social Channels
 

Every time I speak with advisors, it amazes me how poorly they execute this simple initiative. Whether it’s a lack of belief in social media or online marketing, it doesn’t really matter. Digital networking is here to stay and if you’re not connected to everyone you should or could be connected to, you’re not properly maximizing this opportunity.

How many people do you know who you aren’t connected to? It’s a massive opportunity for your practice. Being connected socially helps you:

  • Stay in touch with your network.
  • Stay top of mind with your audience.
  • Build your influence.
  • Grow your brand.
  • Expand your COI base and reach their audiences (referrals)
  • Expand your Ideal Prospect base.
  • Encourage and inspire Clients to refer more often and more easily.
  • Ultimately, significantly increase referrals.
     

Best practices:

  • Understand your audience segments and be in social networks they use.
  • Use personal message when inviting.
  • Value of your social network and treat it accordingly.
     

2. ‘Recommended List’ Social Inviting
 

Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook all make recommendations for new connections for you. They do this to keep you inspired to continue to use their social network and to help you find new opportunities to expand your business. Respect these “connection recommendations” otherwise you may lose your ability to invite. If you play along and obey the network’s etiquette, you can grow your network by 10-50 new connections every month. It’s a quick and easy way to grow your digital network – just don’t abuse it.

While most social networks have abuse protocols in place they still want you to succeed. Do what they allow you to do and take advantage of their recommendations.

Best practices:

  • I recommend only inviting 50-100 per week via LinkedIn.
  • Twitter has no limits, follow as many as you wish and hope for reciprocal follows. ‘Unfollow’ when your ‘Following’ list gets too high. Twitter has a ratio of Follow-to-Being-Followed – stay within it.
  • On Facebook, add friends of ideal friends.
     

3. Social Stalking
 

‘Social stalking’ is by no means new but it’s not often leveraged by the average advisor in their marketing arsenal. I’d recommend implementing a simple ‘social stalking’ tactics in your social media strategy.

‘Social stalking’ starts with finding regional and/or local influencers. Once you’ve connected with them, you monitor their online behavior. When you find a relevant social post you ‘like’, thoughtfully comment and share it with your network. Make sure to tag them or a subject in your comment, it helps you get noticed by their network and people interested in that subject. It’s a fantastic way to expand your reach and get noticed by your audience’s networks. You’ll ignite connection requests, perhaps slowly but, if done well, surely. I get 5-10 connection requests per month on LinkedIn. Social stalking may appear selfish but you’re also helping your target get noticed in your network. It’s a win-win-win situation; peer/you/prospect.

Best practices:

  • Help Others To Help Yourself
  • Add Value with Your Comments, Don’t Challenge or Embarrass
  • Identify 10-20 You Can Monitor
  • Share Comments @ 5-10 Per Week
     

4. Invite Guests To Your Podcast/Blog
 

Business is about relationships. The relationships you benefit most from are often with people who have influence with your ideal audience. In some cases they can add valuable expertise to your audience’s needs and other times they may be in completely unrelated industries. Obviously, the related industry experts and centers of influence are the real opportunity for you and your business.

When you’ve identified experts to follow and monitor, after having built up some credibility and rapport online, it’s a good idea to consider inviting the most engaged peers as guests on your podcast or blog. You can accomplish several key benefits from this: 1) extract expertise that educates your audience and promotes their business, 2) one posted, gives them a link to promote your podcast/blog to their audience, and 3) shows your audience how committed you are to adding value to your relationship with them.

Best Practices:

  • Use a thoughtful letter or email to invite local peers.
  • Be aware of local influencers in case you meet them out and about.
  • Help peers identify topics that will appeal to your audience.
  • Package your podcast/blog professionally and make it easy to share
     

ONE PROVEN MUST-HAVE STRATEGY
 

A Compelling Brand
 

Who’d have thought a ‘branding’ guy would suggest the need for a compelling brand in attracting ideal prospects online? I preach this daily. It’s the single most important marketing strategy there is for this profession. Be seen as different, better or at least relevant (valuable to a specific audience).

A good advisor brand creates intrigue and establishes credibility quickly. Imagine the waste of money and time in creating and implementing marketing tactics without an appealing brand when they finally get to “meet” you. Advisors I talk with experience a lot of pain when they consider the wasted marketing efforts and dollars they’ve spent without a better story and image.

Kirk Lowe
Advisor Marketing
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Kirk Lowe is a sought after expert on branding for financial services. He is the Chief Branding Tactician at TactiBrand and the founder of AdvisorContentX & Financial Mark ... Click for full bio

NBA Player Carl Landry Demonstrates the Value of Persistence in Life and Work

NBA Player Carl Landry Demonstrates the Value of Persistence in Life and Work

Written by: Jon Sabes

When you meet Carl Landry, stand-out college basketball player and nine-year NBA player, you imagine that becoming a professional basketball star was a straight forward run for the 6-foot-nine-inch power forward. 


However, when you go deeper into Carl’s background, becoming a NBA professional was less than certain and little came easily to the 33-year-old from Milwaukee:

  • He was cut from his high school team as a freshman and averaged less than ten points a game when he did play as a senior.
  • He started his college career not at Purdue, but a junior college where it was not clear he would play.
  • When he finally got to Purdue, he tore his ACL in his knee his first year and reinjured it the next year.
  • While his family held a party for him the night of the NBA draft, he slept in the Philadelphia airport after missing a flight following a workout for the 76ers.
  • In the NBA playoffs, Carl had a tooth knocked out, but came back in the same game to make a game-winning blocked shot as the Rockets beat the Utah Jazz 94-92.
     

Landry, who I interviewed on my podcast, Innovating Life with Jon Sabes (www.jonsabes.com), is a remarkable example of the value of “persistence.” In a time where technology creates the image that anything is possible at the touch of a button, persistence is an under-appreciated trait. When I spoke with Carl, I clearly saw someone for whom success has only come through a force of will that made him a NBA player, but it also made him a better player every year he played. That’s the kind of personality that has produced greatness in business as well as sports.

Carl was, in fact, drafted that night he spent in the airport. The Seattle Supersonics chose him as the 31st overall pick and then traded him to the Houston Rockets where he rode the bench for much of the first half of the season. When All-Star teammate Yao Ming was injured, he stepped in and played a key role in the Rockets astonishing 22-game winning streak (the third longest streak in NBA history). And, that season, after sitting on the bench for 33 of the first 36 games, he was named to the All-Rookie second team.

Carl was the first in his family to go to college. “I told myself that this was my ticket out, so I did everything I possibly could to be the best person in school and also on the court,” he said.

His family life in Milwaukee showed him what he didn’t want to do. “Just being honest with you, seeing some my cousins, peers, they went to work for jobs paying six, seven dollars an hour or they didn’t go to work at all and then living off welfare. I didn’t want that.”

When he was first injured, he had to contemplate the end of a career before it even got started. “When you have an ACL tear, it’s over…no more basketball,” he told me. “I said, God, give me health again and I’ll do everything I can to leave it all out on the line and be a successful individual.”

On my podcast, Carl pointed out another interesting lesson he learned in the NBA: Not doing things just to fit in.

“Fitting in was easy,” he said. “Doing everything that everybody else does was easy. If I stood out in some type of way, I’m going to have different results. I’m going to have stand-out results.”


That’s called the “Law of Contrast” and it produces that exact effect of changing the outcomes that everyone else is experiencing.  Carl is smart, he recognized that differences make a difference, and doing whatever it takes is what is required to make real, meaningful differences.

Every off-season for the last 11 years, he has run a camp for kids in Milwaukee where he tells youth his story of hard work and persistence. “I always tell the kids to apply themselves and always be persistent,” he said. “If you dream, apply yourself and be persistent. With hard work, man, the sky’s the limit.”

When Carl says the sky’s the limit he means it.  He is smart to recognize that it’s important to dream big, because if we don’t – we may be selling ourselves short. “You have to dream bigger than your mind could ever imagine,” he said. “I wanted a nice house. I wanted a nice car. I said, and I got all of that. So, what do I do, do I stop now? Maybe I didn’t dream big enough.” That’s a big statement coming from a kid who grew up to be the first in his family to graduate college and go on to be not only a top NBA basketball start, but a good businessman, father and someone who gives back to the community.

I’m convinced that in whatever he takes on as a basketball player or in his post-hoops career, Carl Landry is not going to stop getting better at whatever he does, and in the process of doing so, make the world a better place.

GWG Holdings, Inc.
Investing in Life
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GWG Holdings, Inc. (Nasdaq:GWGH) the parent company of GWG Life, is a financial services company committed to transforming the life insurance industry through disruptive and i ... Click for full bio