How the Benefits of the DOL Fiduciary Rule Have Already Taken Root

How the Benefits of the DOL Fiduciary Rule Have Already Taken Root

When Linda and Bill came into my office, I could sense their hesitancy right away. And when they told me their story, I could understand why they were so apprehensive about meeting with a financial advisor. They had, quite simply, learned not to trust.

Like many people, they’d realized they needed to stop being “do-it-yourselfers” and begin working with a financial professional. What they didn’t know was how to find a good advisor whose advice was based on their needs—not the advisor’s pockets. Unfortunately, it took them many years to understand the difference. “When I retired, our advisor gave me all the reasons why I should roll over my retirement savings into an IRA, and it seemed like a good idea,” said Linda. “But what I didn’t understand was that it was probably more of a good idea for him than for me.” That understanding came when a friend pointed out the fees she’d paid—and how much her advisor had earned in commissions from the transaction. Linda handed me the article her friend had shared with her that called out the practice of advisors receiving big perks (“say, a six-day, five-night resort vacation in Maui”) for selling a particular product. Ouch. Then Bill chimed in: “When I was 68 and had been collecting Social Security for two years already, someone told me I should have waited to claim until I was 70…that it would have added 30% to my monthly check,” he said. “When I asked our advisor why he hadn’t advised me on this, he said I’d never asked. I hadn’t, but I didn’t know what I didn’t know!”

The conversation got me thinking: with news about Trump signing an executive order delaying the DOL Fiduciary Rule—and even potentially doing away with the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, investors need more education than ever. And if these regulations do fall away in the wake of the new administration, caveat emptor—or “let the buyer beware”—should be the phrase on everyone’s lips, and it should be driving every financial decision you make, from how and where to invest your hard-earned savings to whom you choose to work with to help guide your financial decisions.

The good news for consumers is that many of the anticipated benefits of the DOL Fiduciary Rule have already taken root. The media attention on the rule brought the idea of “fiduciary responsibility” into the mainstream, shining light on the difference between a fiduciary who is legally bound to act in the best interest of his or her client and ensure no conflict of interest, and a non-fiduciary advisor who is typically compensated by commission and is held only to a suitability obligation. (For more on this topic, see my blog When did it become ok to be financially illiterate?) But even with that knowledge, how do you choose an advisor who is not only working in your best interest, but is also a good fit for you?

The first step is to do your research. Get referrals from investors and other financial professionals, and be sure the advisor is a fiduciary who is, indeed, working in your best interest. When you meet face to face, here are five questions to ask to help you get the information you need to make a smart, informed choice:

  • What are your credentials? The most trusted in the industry are Certified Financial Planner®(CFP®), Personal Financial Specialist (CPA/PFS), and Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC). This article talks about the benefits of each.
     
  • How are you compensated? Fee-only advisors minimize conflict of interest by receiving compensation only from the client. Fee-only advisors receive no commissions or other perks for the products they recommend. Other compensation models include fee-based, which is a combination of fees and commissions, and commissions only. If the advisor does earn commissions, ask if they come from product sales, from securities trading, or both, as well as specifically how much that commission is. (Yes, it’s okay to ask!)
     
  • May I see your ADV? Every Registered Investment Advisor is required to file a Form ADV with the SEC. The ADV outlines the details of the practice, including compensation, experience, service offerings, and any disciplinary history. Consider the ADV your advisor’s resume.
     
  • What services do you offer? Know what you want and, even more importantly, what you need. Investment management may be at the top of your list, but what about financial and retirement planning? Do you need a Social Security claiming strategy? Do you have the right type of insurance and the right level of coverage? What about estate planning? Understand what your advisor offers and if she has a network of trusted professionals to support the needs she doesn’t provide in-house.
     
  • How can you help me simplify and improve my personal finances? Like Linda and Bill, you may not know what you don’t know. This question can help you uncover unexpected ways the advisor can help you make changes that can lead to greater financial confidence and a better long-term financial outlook. After all, your financial success—today and far into the future—is the ultimate goal.
     

In our own Investment Policy Statement (and no matter who you choose to work with, be sure you receive and review this contract carefully!), we break down the roles and responsibilities of the three key partners in the road to financial wellness: the custodian (whose job it is to hold and protect your assets), the advisor (whose job it is to design and implement a financial and investment plan based on your needs and goals, and to regularly monitor the performance of that plan), and the investor—that’s you!—who has three key responsibilities: 1) to oversee your advisor, 2) to understand what you want to achieve and communicate those goals to your advisor even as they change over time, and 3) to carefully review your statements and be sure you understand how your money is being invested, how you are being charged, and if your plan is fulfilling your needs. If you’re clear about those roles and responsibilities and do your part, a well-chosen advisor should serve you well.

No matter how you feel about what role the government should play when it comes to protecting consumers, ultimately, you alone are responsible for managing your money. Trusting your advisor is important, but the person you really need to trust is yourself. Keep in mind the definition of caveat emptor: “the principle that the buyer alone is responsible for checking the quality and suitability of goods before a purchase is made.” And remember, it’s your money. It’s your responsibility.

Lauren Klein
Advisor
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Lauren (CFP®) (CDFA), a NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, and a member of the Financial Planning Association (FPA), she served as a board member of the Orang ... Click for full bio

Alternative Beta Strategies: Alpha/Beta Separation Comes to Hedge Funds

Alternative Beta Strategies: Alpha/Beta Separation Comes to Hedge Funds

Written by: Yazann Romahi, Chief Investment Officer of Quantitative Beta Strategies, J.P. Morgan Asset Management

A quiet revolution is taking place in the alternatives world. The idea of alpha/beta separation has finally made its way from traditional to alternative investing. This development brings with it a more transparent, liquid and cost-effective approach to accessing the “alternative beta” component of hedge fund return and a new means for benchmarking hedge fund managers.

The good news for investors is that the separation of hedge fund return into its components—rules-based alternative beta and active manager alpha—has the potential to shift investing as we know it. These advancements could democratize hedge funds and, at long last, make what are essentially hedge fund strategies available to all investors—even those who aren’t willing to hand over the hefty fees often associated with hedge fund investing.

A benchmark for alternatives


With respect to traditional equity investing, we have long accepted the idea that there is a market return, or beta—but this hasn’t always been the case. Investors used to assume that to make money in the stock markets, one needed to buy the right stocks and avoid the wrong ones. The idea of a market return independent of skilled stock selection seemed ridiculous to most market participants. Yet today, we would never invest in an active manager’s strategy without benchmarking it against its respective beta.

Interestingly, hedge fund managers have been held to a different standard. Investors have been much more willing to accept the notion that hedge fund strategy returns are pure alpha, and that their investment returns are based entirely on the skill of the fund manager. That notion explains why investors have been willing to accept a “two and twenty” fee structure just to access what has been perceived as one of the most sophisticated and powerful investment vehicles available.

In thinking about the concept of beta, consider its precise definition—the return achievable by taking on a systematic exposure to an economically compensated risk. In traditional long only equity investing, the traditional market beta has been further refined as a number of other risks have been identified that are commonly referred to as “strategic beta.” These include factors such as value, momentum, quality and size. But no one ever said that these risk factors must be long-only.

Over the past decade, as more hedge fund data became available, academics began to disaggregate hedge fund return into two components: compensation for a systematic exposure to a long/short type of risk (alternative beta), and an unexplained “manager alpha.” What they found is that a significant portion of hedge fund return can be attributed to alternative beta. That fact has turned the tables on how we look at hedge fund return. With the introduction of the alternative beta concept, hedge fund managers will have to state their results, not just in terms of total return, but also as excess return over an alternative beta benchmark.

Merger arbitrage—an alternative beta example


The merger arbitrage hedge fund style can be used to illustrate the alternative beta concept. In the case of merger arbitrage, the beta strategy would be the systematic process of going long every target company, while shorting its acquirer. There is an inherent return to this strategy because the target stock price typically does not immediately rise to the offer price upon the deal’s announcement. This creates an opportunity to purchase the stock at a discount prior to the deal’s completion. The premium that remains is compensation to the investor for bearing the risk that the deal may fail.

Active merger arbitrage managers can add value by choosing to invest in some deals while avoiding others. Therefore, their benchmark should be the “enter every deal” strategy, not cash. In fact, the beta strategy explains the majority of the return to the average merger arbitrage hedge fund. And it doesn’t stop there. Other hedge fund styles that can be explained using alternative beta include equity long/short, global macro, and event driven. Note that the beta strategy invests in the same securities, using the same long/short techniques as the hedge fund strategy. The difference is that the beta strategy is a rules-based version that can become the benchmark for the hedge fund strategy. After all, if a hedge fund strategy cannot beat its respective rules-based benchmark (net of fees), an investor may be wiser to stick to the beta strategy.

Implications for investors


What does all this mean for the end investor? Hedge funds have traditionally been the domain of sophisticated investors willing to pay high fees and sacrifice liquidity. Alpha/beta separation in the hedge fund world means that investors can finally choose whether to buy the active version of the hedge fund strategy or opt for the passive (beta) version. Hedge fund strategies can be effective portfolio diversifiers. Now, through alternative beta, virtually all investors can access what are essentially hedge fund strategies in a low cost, liquid, and fully transparent form. For investors who haven’t had prior access to hedge funds, this could be welcome news. Not only can investors look at an active hedge fund manager’s strategy and determine how it has done compared to the systematic beta equivalent, they can also invest in ETFs that encapsulate these systematic strategies.

When looking at one’s traditional balanced portfolio today, there are plenty of questions around whether the fixed income portion will achieve the same level of diversification it has provided in the past. After all, with yields still low, there is little income return. Additionally, the capital gains that came from interest rate declines are likely to reverse. With fixed income unlikely to adequately fulfill its traditional role in portfolios, there is a need to find an alternative source of diversification. This is where alternative strategies may help. For investors seeking to access diversifying strategies in liquid and low-cost vehicles, alternative beta strategies in ETF form are one option.

Looking for an alternative to enhance diversification in your portfolio?


For investors looking to further diversify their overall portfolio, JPMorgan Diversified Alternatives ETF (JPHF) seeks to increase diversification and reduce overall portfolio volatility through direct, diversified exposure to hedge fund strategies using a bottom-up, rules-based approach.

Learn more about JPHF and J.P. Morgan’s suite of ETFs here

DISCLOSURE

Call 1-844-4JPM-ETF or visit www.jpmorganetfs.com to obtain a prospectus. Carefully consider the investment objectives and risks as well as charges and expenses of the ETF before investing. The summary and full prospectuses contain this and other information about the ETF. Read them carefully before investing.
J.P. Morgan Asset Management
Empowering Better Decisions
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See how ETFs differ from other investment vehicles, learn how to evaluate them, and discover how ETFs can be used effectively to achieve a diversity of investment strategies. ... Click for full bio