How to Get More Customer Referrals

How to Get More Customer Referrals

In last week’s blog, I made a distinction between “likely to recommend” and “actually recommend.” I also suggested that from my vantage point the Net Promoter Score® (which is calculated using a single question about likelihood to recommend) has greater predictive value for customer loyalty (return business and future spend) than it does about advocacy (referrals).

Also in last week’s blog, I indicated that customers have a variety of reasons why they don’t recommend brands even though they are otherwise loyal (e.g. wanting not to have their favorite places overrun with new customers). Finally, I promised this week I would offer tips on how to convert loyal customers into referral sources.

So without further ado, here are some broad approaches to activating promoter behavior in your loyal customer base:
 

1. Remind them you operate from referrals. This may seem obvious but few businesses formalize this utterance. Any time you determine a customer is highly satisfied or strongly emotionally engaged with your brand (e.g. direct feedback from them, a 9 or 10 on the NPS®, or you receive stellar results on a satisfaction inventory), you have an opportunity to let your customer know that your ability to serve them is fueled by their referrals.

2. Thank those that make referrals. By asking customers how they heard about your business you can track how much of your new customer acquisition comes from “word of mouth.” This calculation is not only an important KPI of customer experience excellence (happy customers sending their friends) but also it is foundational to an important follow-up question, “Who may I thank for referring you?” A personal thank you note or small unexpected thank you gift goes a long way to sustaining referral behavior.

3. Make it easy to make referrals. One of the great things about social media is the ease with which customers can make what I refer to as “passive” referrals through the power of “social shares” or “likes.” Making it easy to socially share their positive moments with your brand allows customers to gently let their community of friends know that they are brand advocates.

In addition to social sharing strategies, consider providing other collateral materials to loyal customers. For example, a marketing collateral that thanks loyal customers for their business can give them a discount for a future purchase based on their loyalty and it can also be constructed to allow them to “gift” a discount to a friend that they want to introduce to your brand.

4. Assure existing customers that you have a long-term commitment to their personal care. Every time a customer refers someone to your business they run the risk that the person they referred will get their needs met instead of the customer making the referral. Subtly, great brands signal an enduring commitment to personal care for loyal customers which implies that as your business grows, you will respond in ways that don’t exploit loyalty. If that message isn’t communicated or if actions don’t support that communication, loyal customers will not only stop referring; worse yet, they will abandon you.

5. Don’t forget the WIIFM. Customer’s need to know “what’s in it for me” when they make a referral. That has to be more than the, “Don’t worry no matter how much we grow, we will take care of you.” message recommended above.

You have to answer the question, “What does a person get for putting their reputation out on behalf of your brand’s reputation?” Often companies take a very instrumental or mercenary approach to this question and reflexively create a “referral incentive.” While monetary referral rewards can be appropriate in certain situations, they can also backfire. Many customers want to refer you because they have strong intrinsic connections to their friends and to your brand. They want to connect the people they care about with the brands that care about them. Being a resource and networker of people and experiences is an intrinsic “what’s in it for me.”

Often by creating incentive programs for referrals, you get people seeking extrinsic incentives (e.g. money) by sending people who may not be closely similar to the very people who are likely to be loyal to you. Inadvertently, you can acquire commodity buyers by attempting to purchase referrals.

Ultimately, your loyal customers want you to be around to serve them. They appreciate the way your business meets their needs, engages them emotionally, and fits their lifestyle. Most of those customers want to share your name with friends but often they need just a little reassurance, a gentle reminder, and an invitation to make referrals a reality.

Joseph Michelli
Insights
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Joseph A. Michelli, Ph.D., is an internationally sought-after speaker, author, and organizational consultant who transfers his knowledge of exceptional business practices in w ... Click for full bio

Retirement Planning Has Its Limits: How to Prepare

Retirement Planning Has Its Limits: How to Prepare

Retirement planning is one of the issues that commonly leads clients to consult financial advisers. One of its essential aspects is creating a plan to save and invest in order to provide a comfortable retirement income. Ideally, this starts many years ahead of retirement, even as early as your first paycheck.

As retirement comes closer, planning for it expands to take in a host of other considerations, such as deciding when to retire, where to live, and what kind of lifestyle you hope to have. When retirement becomes a reality, the focus shifts to carrying out the plan.

All of this planning is crucial. Yet, for both financial advisers and clients, it's good to keep in mind that planning has its limits. In the post-retirement years, it may be helpful to think in terms of preparing for old age rather than planning for it.

The older we get, the more important this distinction between planning and preparing becomes. Too many life-changing things can happen without regard to our best-laid plans. Often they occur unexpectedly, resulting in emergency situations where urgent decisions have to be made. A stroke or a fall, a diagnosis of terminal illness, a broken hip that leaves someone unable to go back to independent living—and suddenly, right now, the family needs to find an assisted living facility, arrange for live-in help, or sell a home.

What are some of the ways to prepare for these contingencies?

  • Explore housing options well ahead of time. Find out what assisted living, home care, and nursing home services and facilities are available where you live and whether they have waiting lists. Have family conversations about possibilities like relocating or sharing households.
  • Research the financial side of these options. Investigate the cost of hiring help at home, assisted living facilities, and nursing care centers. Find out what is and is not covered by Medicare and long-term care insurance. For example, people are sometimes surprised to learn that Medicare does not pay for nursing home care other than short-term medical stays.
  • Designate someone to take over decision-making, and do the paperwork. Execute documents like a living will, medical power of attorney, and contingent power of attorney. Update them as necessary, and give copies to your doctors, your financial planner, and appropriate family members.  
  • Start relatively early to downsize. Well before you're ready to let go of possessions or move into smaller housing, start considering what to do with your "stuff." Focus on the decisions rather than the distribution. There's no need to get rid of possessions prematurely, but decide what you want to do with them—and put in writing. Do this while it's still your choice, rather than something your family members do while you're in the hospital or nursing home
  • Do your best to practice flexibility and acceptance. No matter how strongly you want to live in your own home until the end of your life, for example, it may not be possible. The physical limitations of aging can limit our choices, and even the best options available may not be what we would like them to be. It is a profound gift to yourself and your family members to accept these realities with as much grace as you can muster.
     

Finally, please don't underestimate the importance of planning financially for retirement. Because the bottom line is that you can't plan for all the things that might happen as you age, but you can prepare to deal with them. One of the most useful tools to cope with those contingencies is having enough money.

Rick Kahler
Advisor
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Rick Kahler, MSFP, ChFC, CFP is a fee-only financial planner, speaker, educator, author, and columnist.  Rick is a pioneer in integrating financial planning and psycholog ... Click for full bio