3 Tips for Talking to Clients about Alternative Investments

3 Tips for Talking to Clients about Alternative Investments

Written by: Jason Plucinak

If you’ve been advising clients for more than a decade, alternative investments probably haven’t been on the list of options you’ve discussed with most of them.


Sure, a handful of clients may have been interested in and understood the value of leveraging alternatives, but the majority of your clients’ portfolios likely consist of equities, bonds, and cash instruments. There’s a reason for that: they make sense.

And for decades, these traditional options have delivered on their promise of generating a consistent return on investment. But now times have changed. The Great Recession drove home the need for greater diversification, and an extended low-interest-rate environment has nearly wiped out expected returns on bonds and cash investments. In the wake of such a shift, many advisors are looking to reallocate client portfolios from a traditional 60/40 model to include at least 20% in alternatives. The question is this: How can you introduce alternatives to clients to get them on board?

Here are 3 tips to help you guide the conversation with even the most traditional investors:

1. Present alternatives that are easy to understand.
 

When considering anything new, investors need to understand where their money is going and how it will deliver a return on investment. That means complexity is your nemesis. By presenting options that have a story your clients can relate to, you can help them feel more attached to what they are investing in. Present easy to understand options and your clients are much more likely to feel at ease.

2. Focus on transparency.


Even the most trusting clients aren’t (and shouldn’t be) willing to invest their hard-earned dollars in something that isn’t completely transparent. Point your clients to offerings that are publicly registered and have public, audited financials. If you do like an investment offering that is structured as a Private Placement, use only those with public, audited financials. Transparency allows you to “look under the hood” to easily understand and explain the fundamentals of the offering. What is the risk exposure? How are assets invested? What is the source of the return on investment? When transparency is a given, your clients know what they’re investing in, so you never have to utter the words, “take my word for it.”

3. Follow up with written details—online or off.


Talking through the details of an alternative investment is a great start, but following up with details can support your client’s decision by confirming what they heard in your meeting. Always include the investment’s official prospectus and be sure you are following your firm’s compliance and advertising guidelines. If your website features a client portal, create a webpage devoted to specific alternatives you recommend. Include clear bullet points covering the features of the offering, a brief commentary stating why you recommend the product, and links to relevant articles by third parties. If you don’t offer a firewalled content area on your website, you can provide the same information in a handout or brochure for your client to take home. Regardless of how you deliver the information, don’t try to sell the product; simply provide the research and information your client needs to make a well-informed decision.

Of course, recommending alternative investments to your clients should always be based on your own clear understanding of the value of each offering and how it fits into each client’s portfolio and overall financial goals. To be sure you know the facts yourself, the Alternative & Direct Investment Securities Association offers a broad array of information about a variety of options

Once you have the knowledge you need, remember to keep it simple when walking through your recommendations with your clients. The result: your clients will not only have a clear picture of how alternative investments can help strengthen their portfolios, they’ll also have the confidence that you’re exploring all the options as their trusted advisor.


Jason Plucinak has over a decade experience as a financial professional in the life insurance, securities, and alternative investment industries. Currently Sr. Vice President of Business Development at GWG Holdings, his background includes wholesaling, sales management, and Broker Dealer due diligence. Mr. Plucinak holds his Series 7and 63 license with Emerson Equity LLC a FINRA registered broker dealer.. Mr. Plucinak earned a Bachelor of Science degree in finance from St. Cloud State University in Minnesota.
GWG Holdings, Inc.
Investing in Life
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GWG Holdings, Inc. (Nasdaq:GWGH) the parent company of GWG Life, is a financial services company committed to transforming the life insurance industry through disruptive and i ... Click for full bio

What's an Investor to Do When History Doesn't Repeat Itself?

What's an Investor to Do When History Doesn't Repeat Itself?

We’re in an era of extremes. It seems a day doesn’t go by without the word “historical” popping up in the financial news.

The equities market and consumer debt are at historical highs. Interest rates and high-yield credit spreads are at historical lows. We haven’t seen even a 5% pull-back in the market this year—for the first time since 1995—and the DJIA is exhibiting its narrowest trading range in history. These are indeed historical times. And whether this fact has you filled with extreme optimism or extreme pessimism, you have some important decisions to make going forward.

There are theories about how we landed in this particular era of extremes, and most are rooted in the significant changes that have impacted both how we live and how we invest. At the top of the list are globalization, automation, and the largest aging population in history (yet another “historical” to add to the list). It’s said that the most dangerous words in investing are, “it’s different this time,” yet one has to wonder if, in fact, it really is different this time. Not just because of the historical market highs. After all, there always has been and always will be a new market high waiting around the corner. What’s different today is the sheer number and confluence of these extreme highs and lows—and their duration. It’s a situation no investor has experienced before, which can make these waters feel pretty daunting. History repeats itself, and investment strategies are largely built on that conviction. But what do we do when it doesn’t? When history fails to repeat itself, how can investors plan for tomorrow with confidence that they are positioned to protect their assets and gain a reasonable level of yield?

The first step is to recognize that, at least in many ways, the investment landscape really is different this time around. All you have to do is look at the numbers to be sure of that fact. And the catalysts I mentioned before—globalization, automation, and the aging population—aren’t going anywhere. If anything, the impact of each will only grow as time moves on. What that means is that there’s no way to predict what’s coming next. The only thing we know for certain is that predictability is a thing of the past (if it ever really existed at all). The result: you need to approach your portfolio differently than you ever have before.

Your goal, of course, is to find return given a risk tolerance. Current yield is an important part of total return and getting it is an elusive proposition in today’s market. If, like many people, you’re less than confident that the four major sectors that currently drive the equities market—healthcare, discretionary, tech, and financial—are poised to continue to rise at even close to recent rates, it may be wise to seek out alternatives to help drive yield without adding more risk to the equation.

But if alternatives are the wise path forward, which alternatives are the best options?

Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), Business Development Companies (BDCs), and energy stocks, traditionally the favored “non-correlated alternatives,” defied expectations when the stock market crashed in 2008, inconveniently revealing high correlations just as the equities market began its freefall. Anyone who was invested in these alternatives at the time knows all too well the devastating impact “non-correlated investments” can have on a portfolio, especially when they fail to do their job when it matters most.

Luckily, there is one alternative that can be counted on to remain uncorrelated to the traditional financial markets and, ultimately, deliver that precious yield: life insurance-based investments. And because this asset is literally built on one of the irreversible catalysts of change, the aging Baby Boomer population, owning life insurance may in fact be the ideal alternative to help investors generate non-correlated returns, regardless of where the market turns next. Even better, these investments typically deliver those returns with very low volatility.

Related: 3 Reasons Alternative Investments May Be Your New Key to Success in Changing Times

What makes life insurance different is that, unlike typical alternative vehicles, secondary life insurance returns aren’t based on the economy. Instead, they are inherently non-correlated because returns are based solely on the longevity of the individual insureds.

As much as we would all love for the bull market to continue on its merry way, one thing history does tell us even today is that a bear market will come. It’s only a matter of when. As you strive to hedge your portfolios and prepare for the inevitable, life insurance-based investments are one tool that can help you achieve the three things you need most: diversification, low volatility, and yield.

Bill Acheson
Investing in Life
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Bill Acheson is the Chief Financial Officer of GWG Holdings, Inc. Mr. Acheson has over 25 years of sophisticated financial services expertise. Mr. Acheson has extensive experi ... Click for full bio