Make the Most out of Every Conference: 5 Steps to Success

Make the Most out of Every Conference: 5 Steps to Success

Written by: Mark V. Petersen

Fall is officially here. Labor Day is behind us and students of every age—from kindergarteners to graduate candidates—are back in school and geared up for another year of learning. The same is true for financial services professionals gearing up for the fall season of conferences, and there are a slew of options to choose from.

The FPA BE Conference is right around the corner, on September 14-16 in Baltimore. San Diego is a hotbed of activity, beginning with the XYPlanning Network Annual Conference and Bob Veres’ Insider’s Forum both on September 19-21, followed by FINCON 2016 September 21-24, then Charles Schwab’s annual IMPACT conference on October 24-27. If you’re on the east coast, NAPFA’s National Conference is closer to home, in Arlington, VA, October 11-14, and IPA Vision in Chicago on October 17-20. And in Las Vegas, the ADISA Annual Conference runs from September 26 - 28. It’s quite a list of possibilities. But whether you’re attending one or handful of events, do you have a plan in place to squeeze the greatest potential out of your time away from the office?

Everyone knows that basking in the Southern California weather and catching up with old friends can be great perks for attendees. But if you’ve ever come home from a conference wondering if it was really worth your investment, it’s time to take a new approach. Follow these 5 steps and make the most out of every conference to help grow your career and your business:

1. Make a plan before you get there.


Don’t wait until you’re on the plane—or, worse yet, standing at the registration table—to make a plan and set your goals for the conference. Print out the attendee list and identify people you want to connect with. Whether it’s a B/D you’ve been hearing about, a vendor of a new technology that can empower your business, or an estate attorney with mutual clients, there’s a huge pool of value at your fingertips. Identify a specific business problem you want to solve while you’re there, then review the agenda and speaker list and plan each day carefully. Target topics that fit your business and are aligned with your growth objectives. It’s all too easy to wander from session to session, only to realize you’ve missed some of the most valuable content—and contacts—when the day is done.

2. Get out of your comfort zone.


One of your goals at any conference should be to challenge your thinking and stretch your boundaries. To be sure that happens, don’t talk to the same people all the time. You’ll never have the opportunity to uncover new opportunities if you’re constantly engaged in conversation with old buddies. Make it your mission to meet five new people every day. Spend more time listening than talking (you have two ears and one mouth for a reason!). If approaching new people is a challenge for you, have one good question at the ready to use as an icebreaker—anything business-focused to start the conversation will do. And when you meet someone who really resonates with you in some way, take the time to build a good relationship. Immediately connect on LinkedIn and ask if it’s ok to follow up in a week. If LinkedIn isn’t an option, ask if you can snap a photo of their name badge or business card so you have the information stored right in your phone.

3. Leave office work at the office.


Ever find yourself at a conference but locked up in your hotel room on a series of conference calls? I have. Guilty as charged. While office emergencies happen, don’t allow this to be the norm. Commit to making the conference your focus. Set up an out of office message on your email and your voicemail, and only respond to items that require your immediate attention. Leave your laptop in your room and keep your phone out of reach! Think you can multi-task by listening to a session while answering email? Cognition studies show you’re doing at least one activity ineffectively—and probably both. If you’re really pressed to get something done at the office, set aside an hour or two to go do it right, then get back to the business of the working the conference.

4. Make the most of evening events.


Pick events based on how well they match your mission. If you’re invited to load onto a bus with people you’ve known for years, be sure to sit with someone new. If the bus trip doesn’t promise good value for your time, think about foregoing the fun and arranging a small, intimate dinner with new acquaintances—and invite them each to invite someone as well. It’s a great way to build your circle of influence, and the relationships you forge in a small group will likely be stronger than those made on the bus. No matter how you choose to spend the evening, always remember that relaxing with a cocktail or two can be great, but overdoing the alcohol can thwart your mission entirely. Your goal is to have conversations you remember clearly the next day, not to get the most “value” from the open bar.

5. Make follow up a priority.


Once you’re back in the office, it’s time to put all the networking you’ve done to use. Make a list of everyone you met and set a plan to follow up. That advisor who was so insightful about marketing to Millennials? Proactively schedule a call to talk more about how she’s achieving success. That vendor who gave a session on an interesting new product for your HNW clients? Send him an email requesting more information and the names and emails of a couple of advisors you can talk to about how they’re using the product successfully. Remember that specific business challenge you wanted to solve? Reflect back and see if you found your answer. If not, review your new LinkedIn and other connections and consider who may have the answer for you, then follow up until you get the answers you need.

Depending on how you approach them, conferences can be extremely valuable…or a colossal waste of time and money. My own success story happened years ago: I walked into my office one Monday only to be told the firm was shutting down and I was out of a job. Already signed up for a conference beginning the next day, I decided the best possible thing I could do in my situation was get out there and keep making connections. At the registration table, I ran into someone I had connected with at numerous events over the years. “How are you doing?” he asked. When I replied with the usual, he didn’t buy it. “No, really Mark. How are you?” As I stood there, my conference badge not yet pinned to my jacket, I told him I’d just been laid off and was trying to decide my next step. His reply: “Can you have dinner with me tonight?” That dinner led to an 18-year career at his firm. All because of a conference connection and being in the right place at the right time.

As you head into conference season, plan wisely and commit to making the most out of your time away from the office. Make valuable connections. Challenge your thinking. Stretch your boundaries. By being smart about how you use your time, you can transform every conference into an opportunity to grow your business and enhance your career.

Mark Petersen has over 25 years of experience leading distribution and sales efforts in the financial services industry. His background includes managing retail and institutional securities sales as well as national accounts, and he has forged strong relationships with broker/dealers and financial advisors throughout his career. Currently Executive Vice President at GWG Holdings, Inc., Mr. Petersen is also a registered representative of Emerson Equity. His previous roles include co-president of Behringer Securities LP and executive sales and marketing positions with CNL Fund Management, Franklin Square Capital Partners, and Madison Harbor Capital. He holds an MBA in finance from Baylor University and a B.S. in business administration from the University of Texas at Arlington.
GWG Holdings, Inc.
Investing in Life
Twitter Email

Through an active and engaged financial professional network, GWG brings access to income and growth opportunities. GWG Holdings, Inc. (Nasdaq: GWGH) specializes in acquiring ... Click for full bio

Alternative Beta Strategies: Alpha/Beta Separation Comes to Hedge Funds

Alternative Beta Strategies: Alpha/Beta Separation Comes to Hedge Funds

Written by: Yazann Romahi, Chief Investment Officer of Quantitative Beta Strategies, J.P. Morgan Asset Management

A quiet revolution is taking place in the alternatives world. The idea of alpha/beta separation has finally made its way from traditional to alternative investing. This development brings with it a more transparent, liquid and cost-effective approach to accessing the “alternative beta” component of hedge fund return and a new means for benchmarking hedge fund managers.

The good news for investors is that the separation of hedge fund return into its components—rules-based alternative beta and active manager alpha—has the potential to shift investing as we know it. These advancements could democratize hedge funds and, at long last, make what are essentially hedge fund strategies available to all investors—even those who aren’t willing to hand over the hefty fees often associated with hedge fund investing.

A benchmark for alternatives


With respect to traditional equity investing, we have long accepted the idea that there is a market return, or beta—but this hasn’t always been the case. Investors used to assume that to make money in the stock markets, one needed to buy the right stocks and avoid the wrong ones. The idea of a market return independent of skilled stock selection seemed ridiculous to most market participants. Yet today, we would never invest in an active manager’s strategy without benchmarking it against its respective beta.

Interestingly, hedge fund managers have been held to a different standard. Investors have been much more willing to accept the notion that hedge fund strategy returns are pure alpha, and that their investment returns are based entirely on the skill of the fund manager. That notion explains why investors have been willing to accept a “two and twenty” fee structure just to access what has been perceived as one of the most sophisticated and powerful investment vehicles available.

In thinking about the concept of beta, consider its precise definition—the return achievable by taking on a systematic exposure to an economically compensated risk. In traditional long only equity investing, the traditional market beta has been further refined as a number of other risks have been identified that are commonly referred to as “strategic beta.” These include factors such as value, momentum, quality and size. But no one ever said that these risk factors must be long-only.

Over the past decade, as more hedge fund data became available, academics began to disaggregate hedge fund return into two components: compensation for a systematic exposure to a long/short type of risk (alternative beta), and an unexplained “manager alpha.” What they found is that a significant portion of hedge fund return can be attributed to alternative beta. That fact has turned the tables on how we look at hedge fund return. With the introduction of the alternative beta concept, hedge fund managers will have to state their results, not just in terms of total return, but also as excess return over an alternative beta benchmark.

Merger arbitrage—an alternative beta example


The merger arbitrage hedge fund style can be used to illustrate the alternative beta concept. In the case of merger arbitrage, the beta strategy would be the systematic process of going long every target company, while shorting its acquirer. There is an inherent return to this strategy because the target stock price typically does not immediately rise to the offer price upon the deal’s announcement. This creates an opportunity to purchase the stock at a discount prior to the deal’s completion. The premium that remains is compensation to the investor for bearing the risk that the deal may fail.

Active merger arbitrage managers can add value by choosing to invest in some deals while avoiding others. Therefore, their benchmark should be the “enter every deal” strategy, not cash. In fact, the beta strategy explains the majority of the return to the average merger arbitrage hedge fund. And it doesn’t stop there. Other hedge fund styles that can be explained using alternative beta include equity long/short, global macro, and event driven. Note that the beta strategy invests in the same securities, using the same long/short techniques as the hedge fund strategy. The difference is that the beta strategy is a rules-based version that can become the benchmark for the hedge fund strategy. After all, if a hedge fund strategy cannot beat its respective rules-based benchmark (net of fees), an investor may be wiser to stick to the beta strategy.

Implications for investors


What does all this mean for the end investor? Hedge funds have traditionally been the domain of sophisticated investors willing to pay high fees and sacrifice liquidity. Alpha/beta separation in the hedge fund world means that investors can finally choose whether to buy the active version of the hedge fund strategy or opt for the passive (beta) version. Hedge fund strategies can be effective portfolio diversifiers. Now, through alternative beta, virtually all investors can access what are essentially hedge fund strategies in a low cost, liquid, and fully transparent form. For investors who haven’t had prior access to hedge funds, this could be welcome news. Not only can investors look at an active hedge fund manager’s strategy and determine how it has done compared to the systematic beta equivalent, they can also invest in ETFs that encapsulate these systematic strategies.

When looking at one’s traditional balanced portfolio today, there are plenty of questions around whether the fixed income portion will achieve the same level of diversification it has provided in the past. After all, with yields still low, there is little income return. Additionally, the capital gains that came from interest rate declines are likely to reverse. With fixed income unlikely to adequately fulfill its traditional role in portfolios, there is a need to find an alternative source of diversification. This is where alternative strategies may help. For investors seeking to access diversifying strategies in liquid and low-cost vehicles, alternative beta strategies in ETF form are one option.

Looking for an alternative to enhance diversification in your portfolio?


For investors looking to further diversify their overall portfolio, JPMorgan Diversified Alternatives ETF (JPHF) seeks to increase diversification and reduce overall portfolio volatility through direct, diversified exposure to hedge fund strategies using a bottom-up, rules-based approach.

Learn more about JPHF and J.P. Morgan’s suite of ETFs here

DISCLOSURE

Call 1-844-4JPM-ETF or visit www.jpmorganetfs.com to obtain a prospectus. Carefully consider the investment objectives and risks as well as charges and expenses of the ETF before investing. The summary and full prospectuses contain this and other information about the ETF. Read them carefully before investing.
J.P. Morgan Asset Management
Empowering Better Decisions
Twitter Email

See how ETFs differ from other investment vehicles, learn how to evaluate them, and discover how ETFs can be used effectively to achieve a diversity of investment strategies. ... Click for full bio