Five Reasons You Haven't Been Able to Make Social Media Work

Five Reasons You Haven't Been Able to Make Social Media Work

I know evolution is a slow process, but we’ve been using social media channels in our marketing for over ten years, and I still get daily questions like, “How do I make social media work for me?” “How to do I build my social media presence faster?” “Why isn’t anyone following me back or clicking to buy my products?”

Very few people want to know how to listen to customers better on social or how to discover what their ideal customers are wanting to read or engage with on social media channels.

Here are 5 reasons you haven’t been able to make social media work for you and your business, regardless of how long you have had accounts set up:


1. You’re Impatient


Everyone wants to know how to get thousands of followers and fans right out of the shoot. Three weeks after setting up an account people wonder why no one is following them back or buying their products. Building a following on any social channel takes planning, writing, focus, consistency. All of those words that equal WORK. Who wants that route? Just buy 10,000 fake followers for $5 and we can all pretend they will buy from you.

You need to do some research (and no, there’s probably not a cliff note version of a book at Barnes and Nobel to give you all of the answers), go to competitor pages and see what type of content they post that people find interesting. Make a list. Don’t say you have no competition unless you have all the customers for what you are selling. Look at the images they share. What type of questions or tips do they share?  How often are they posting? Now take the time to create great content that your potential audience would like. And if you are concerned about posting good content before you have an audience there to read it, keep in mind, you don’t want to invite people to an empty house. You need something interesting and helpful there before you start inviting people to join you.

Once you start posting, don’t stop. Do it daily. Multiple times a day, and before you groan too loud saying you don’t have time, keep in mind the organizations that have large followings are doing the work. They are not getting the engagement by posting once in a while.

2. You Don’t Really Care What Other People Have to Say


In face-to-face conversations, you know those people who watch your mouth move while your talking, just waiting for you to stop so they can tell you all about themselves? That’s what many people do on social media channels. They don’t want to spend time having to read other people’s posts or engage in groups where you’d have to spend time actually listening to other experts and people discuss things that aren’t about YOU.

On social channels, you have to be…SOCIAL! It isn’t all about you talking and everyone else listening. It’s about you listening and answering and listening some more and asking some questions and listening to the answers before you talk again. For some of you, I can almost see you reaching for pencils to jam in your ears already. Relationships are built on two-way conversations, and on social, it is those small conversations with hundreds of people. (Go ahead…poke just one in.)

If all you are doing with your social marketing is posting content with no conversations or responses, you may as well just stick to your website that you think is interactive because you have the words CONTACT US on it. Social may not be in your blood, and you can check if you pull that pencil back out!

3. Your Content Isn’t That Great


This is a hard one. We all fall in love with our own content and are convinced that everyone else will as well. Like the 2009 movie with Ben Affleck and Jennifer Aniston, “He’s Just Not That Into You.” It could be you need to pitch what hasn’t been working and give your brand a makeover because they’re just not that into you…YET.

We need to consistently be refining our message and finding the voice that is both authentic and yet one that will connect with the audience we are seeking. There’s an old joke, “Be yourself. Unless you’re a jerk, then be someone else!” You just may need to tweak how your brand is coming across in your content.

Many of us have gone through management or leadership training where you take a communication style assessment or behavioral assessment to discover our strengths and “areas for improvement” when it comes to building relationships. We learn where we need to adapt. It is the person who can most easily adapt that survives and thrives in any environment.

The bottom line in any communication or relationship is to be able to adapt to the styles of others if you want to be successful. Our content is no different. We have to see what people engage with and what they don’t, and then make changes accordingly.  Do you write using language that is too “verbose?” Do your images need more visual appeal? Go back to your competition and see what is working there and then make some adjustments.

4. You Have Siloed Your Marketing


Many companies suffer when their marketing team is siloed from the other departments as if they don’t need input from everyone. Social media has been siloed from many marketing teams as well. People see these channels and activities as separate, not needing to coordinate or blend with other company objectives. Whole campaigns are created in some organizations without giving social consideration. No input or thought about how ideas and objectives can be met on social channels.

Another way we put our social marketing into a silo is when we don’t tell our face-to-face audiences about our social channels. We have a website without links to social channels (or the links that are there don’t work). We have business cards with no reference to an online presence. Our email signature never eludes to other ways someone may want to connect.

One of my favorite quotes came from a presentation by Avinash Kaushik, who said, “If today’s social tools are not in your blood it is difficult to imagine their power & use them for good.” There are many who know they should be using social media tools in their marketing, but they truly cannot fathom how they can work to build relationships and ultimately impact their business. These are the ones who end up saying, “social media is a waste of time.” Their short-sightedness and impatience will never allow success in.

5. You’re Too Busy


This is by far, the most common excuse (or reason) I hear for why people are not experiencing success using social media in their marketing. After all, you have real work to do. You have a business to run. Perhaps the good news is, you won’t have a business for long if you don’t learn to use today’s tools to connect with your audience. Think of all that free time you’ll have.

I live and breathe this industry 24/7/365 and I know the struggle. It is very real. There are too many things to do in a day. I don’t have time to sit on Facebook or Twitter, and don’t even get me started about Snapchat. Because this is our industry, of course, I make time for these activities, but when it comes to payroll, bookkeeping or paying taxes, I don’t have time for those things! But if I don’t do them, or hire someone to do them, I wouldn’t be in business very long.

Instead of using this excuse for why you have spent a few hours here and there over the past 10 years (adding up to a gazillion hours) and still haven’t made progress, commit to making time to do it right or hiring someone to help you. Of course, you can always stop those time-sucking activities like watching television and spend that same number of hours per week working on your marketing.

So admit it, which one of these reasons has been holding you back?

 

Gina Schreck
Marketing
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Gina Schreck is the president at SocialKNX, a content marketing and social media management agency. She was voted by FastCompany as one of the top 50 female influencers in soc ... Click for full bio

Most Read IRIS Articles of the Week: April 17-21

Most Read IRIS Articles of the Week: April 17-21

Here’s a look at the Top 11 Most Viewed Articles of the Week on IRIS.xyz, April 17-21, 2017 


Click the headline to read the full article.  Enjoy!


1. Market Keeping You up at Night? Look for the Right Hedge


Like so many others in the industry, I was wrong. For years, I was certain that the bull market was nearing its end. I thought the market was over-extended, and that, surely, the wild equities run was coming to an end. But everyone else was bullish, and perhaps rightfully so. And while I’ve watched equities continue on their spectacular rise, I do think now is the time (really!) to put a hedge in place. Here’s why. Here’s how. — Adam Patti

2. How to Manage Bond Market Pain and Seek the Gain When Rates Are Rising


The realities for fixed income investors have changed. How is this being reflected in markets? Bond investing has become increasingly difficult over the past decade. Markets have been heavily distorted by ultra-low interest rates and quantitative easing, as well as by extreme risk aversion in response to the global economic crisis and the eurozone debt crisis. — Nick Gartside

3. Seven Reasons You'll Fail as a Financial Advisor


Is being a financial advisor worth it? I am an optimistic person and I encourage other people to keep a positive mental attitude (shout-out to Napoleon Hill and W. Clement Stone). However, by taking a good, hard look at the negatives in life, we can successfully pivot towards the positive aspects that will help us achieve our goals. — James Pollard

4. The Secret to Turning Every Prospect into a Client


How do you treat one of your most valued, existing clients? Here’s a list of some things that come to mind. — Andrew Sobel

5. Why Do Clients Change Advisors?


According to many advisors I speak with, the only clients that leave are those who have died. And while attrition may not be a big problem in this industry, I have to assume that at least a few clients change advisors without doing so via the funeral home. — Julie Littlechild

6. Why You Should Focus on Getting Referral Sources


I was talking with an advisor last week about how to get into conversations about what he does. He was relaying the story of going jogging with a friend who could be a good client but is, more importantly, connected to a large network of people who fit this advisors ideal client description. — Stephen Wershing

7. How Big Picture Thinkers Seize More Opportunities in 7 Steps


Big picture thinkers are not unicorns - rare and mystical. And they were not born with the innate ability to think big. They do, however, pay attention to the broader landscape and take the time to think, analyze and evaluate. — Jill Houtman and Danny Domenighini

8. 5 Actions to Build Your Reputation


Your reputation is who you are and how you show up, Monday to Monday®.  Many of us take our image and reputation for granted.  Give careful thought to the kind of reputation that you would be proud of Monday to Monday® and that would resonate with your purpose and priorities. — Stacey Hanke

9. How Are You Poised to Begin Welcoming GenZ to Your Workplace?


The generational changing of the guard is a fact of life as old as time. Young replaces old in responsibility, importance, control and culture. Outside of the family, the workplace is perhaps where this is seen most regularly by most people. — Shirley Engelmeier

10. Are Price Objections REALLY Price Objections?


Next time you hear your prospects give you price objections, it’s not because of the price. The give price objections because they don’t know the full value proposition that they’d be paying for. And it’s not based on their need, or your features and functions. It’s based on the buying criteria they want to meet internally. — Sofia Carter

11. Understanding the Economic Value of Transition Deals


Last week we wrote about the economic rationale behind going independent vs. moving to another major firm as an employee. As a follow-up topic, we thought it prudent to analyze transition packages attached to big firm moves and peel back the layers of the onion to show the components of these deals. — Louis Diamond

Douglas Heikkinen
Perspective
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IRIS Founder and Producer of Perspective—a personal look at the industry, and notables who share what they’ve learned, regretted, won, lost and what continues to ... Click for full bio