Don’t Kill Your Career With Your Fork

Don’t Kill Your Career With Your Fork

My girlfriend showed me how to use my utensils, but I’m not sure she is correct. I have a job interview at a fancy restaurant coming up. Help. 

My colleague never puts his knife down when eating. Is that correct?

I read that there is a “finished position” for utensils. What is that? 


I have received a number of questions recently about correct behavior during a business meal, especially concerning the use of utensils.

People can get nervous when dining for business. And with good reason. You don’t want to blow a deal or a job offer based on your dining manners. To help people in my corporate classes remember what not to do with their utensils, I created these four examples: 

1. Waving William: You wave your hands around with your utensils in them when you are talking at the table. Beware – the food on the utensils may go flying toward your neighbor! It’s best not to do much gesturing at all while you are dining, and never with a utensil in hand.

2. Finger-Pusher Fran: You want to eat every last bite, so you use your finger to help push food onto your fork. The days of the “clean plate club” are over. If you can’t get the food onto your fork without using your finger, leave it on the plate. Or, eat Continental style. In this style, the knife is used to push food onto the back of the fork. 

3. Pitchfork Pete: You make a fist around your fork when cutting your meat. You look like you are holding a pitchfork! You should hold a fork with the handle inside the palm of your hand, and use your thumb and index finger to manipulate it.

4. Split-Personality Susan: You employ both the American and Continental styles of using utensils during one meal. When eating in the American style, you cut your meat using both knife and fork, then place your knife at the top of the plate and switch the fork to the dominant hand to eat. When eating in the Continental style, you still cut your food with both knife and fork, but then you eat the meal without putting the knife down or switching the fork to the opposite hand. As mentioned above, you use the knife to guide food onto the back of the fork. It’s generally best to use just one style.

Other Suggestions for Your Utensils:

  • Do not use your knife to cut your bread rolls. Break your roll in half, then tear off one piece at a time, and butter each piece as you are ready to eat it. 
  • Place your knife and fork in the rest position (knife on top of plate, fork across middle of plate) to let the waiter know you are resting but not done with your meal. Use the finished position (knife and fork together diagonally across the plate, knife on top) to indicate that you have finished eating. 


Additional information about business meals and your career can be found in my new book, The Communication Clinic: 99 Proven Cures for the Most Common Business Mistakes (McGraw Hill, December 2016).

Barbara Pachter
Personal Development
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Barbara Pachter is an internationally-renowned business etiquette and communications speaker, coach and author of 10 books, including The Essentials of Business Etiquette: How ... Click for full bio

Choose a Client Portal as Wisely as Choosing Your Dog

Choose a Client Portal as Wisely as Choosing Your Dog

People tell me that dogs are a sign of how the dog owner feels about him or herself and what they value. I agree.

The 6'9" man with the tiny dog tells me that he values love, being cuddled and protected. The scruffy 5'9" man with the two greyhounds tells me he values the feeling of being stately and proper. And the woman with the fancy white poodle values feeling sharp and noticed.

A consumer portal is no different.


The portal and contents send a clear message on what the business values the most and wants its clients to value. If the portal showcases investment performance, the advisory firm is telling the client that investment performance matters the most.

If the portal accentuates a person's net worth or probability of reaching their financial goals (2nd home, college, retirement), the advisor is telling the client to care most about achieving their goals and watching their bottom line.

Related: Avoiding the Integration of Technology Can Mean the Death of Your Business

So before your business chooses a consumer portal, think about the message you want to send to the public and clients. It is no different than the message that your dog is publicly sharing about you. What you choose tells others what you value. And just like a dog, you can't return the portal so easily. So choose wisely.

If you seek help, don’t hesitate to click HERE to schedule a one-time Boost Call or HERE to inquire into our lean, business operations strategy services.

Jennifer Goldman
Operational Excellence
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Jennifer Goldman is founder of My Virtual COO and comes to us with 20 years' experience optimizing the use of tech and people to improve RIA firms' productivity and profitabil ... Click for full bio