Takeaways from the Viral BBC Interview We Can’t Stop Watching

Takeaways from the Viral BBC Interview We Can’t Stop Watching
 

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Have you seen it? A video of a BBC contributor whose children not-so-casually interrupt his on-air interview has gone viral, and while we can’t stop watching the hilarity ensue, we also stopped to think about what we’d do if this had happened to one of our clients.

In today’s media environment, outlets are utilizing a number of new technology tools to broadcast interviews. The introduction of Cheddar TV and Facebook Live has increased the popularity of Skype and remote guest interviews, which has led to us expanding our media training program to discuss how to prepare for these non-traditional environments. Below are a few quick takeaways for how to ensure your interview doesn’t end up taking the internet by storm in a not so flattering way.

Know your environment. 


When preparing for a Skype interview that will take place in your home, office, or elsewhere, consider your surroundings before stepping into the limelight. Make sure the lighting is flattering and any clutter behind you doesn’t detract from what you are saying. Visually unappealing items in the background draw the viewer’s eye, so take the time to do a little clean up beforehand. In the case of the viral video mentioned above, consider locking your door if your kids are home to make sure they don’t come storming in during your screen time.

Know your audience. 


We stress this in any interview setting, and it’s just as important for broadcast interviews. The emergence of these new channels will continue to break the mold, so double check that your talking points are geared toward the audience you are addressing. Cheddar and Facebook Live target millennials, while traditional outlets like CNBC and Fox Business—who have also started to conduct Skype-style interviews—are geared toward more experienced investors.

Know your technology. 


Unless you have an on-site studio at your office, chances are you are working with a web-camera. Do a test drive with a family member, colleague or PR team to know where the camera is angled, how you should be sitting and if you need to adjust your lighting. Have your Skype account set up beforehand and check your internet connection to avoid any glitches.

At the end of the day, remember that Murphy’s Law can always come into play. Anything that can happen, will happen. There’s no such thing as too much preparation when your reputation and credibility are on the line.

Joe Anthony
Public Relations
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Joe Anthony is a PR Strategist with 12 years experience in public relations and financial communications. He is responsible for leading the agency's financial services PR unit ... Click for full bio

Advisors Will Be Extinct in 5 Years Unless…

Advisors Will Be Extinct in 5 Years Unless…

I’ve had financial advisors for more than 40 years. Not once in those years have I called my advisor to find out what stock/funds I should buy or sell. But I have called to find out where I should get my first mortgage, when to sell my house, or how much income I could get in retirement.

In short -- and I think I’m pretty typical – I was looking for financial advice, as it relates to my life.

Here’s the disconnect, what most advisors do is simply manage their clients’ assets. They determine what to buy, and what to sell, they think about risk management, about growing their practice by finding new clients and about getting paid.

Historically that has been the business model. But as more women take control over financial assets, they, like me, will be looking for a different experience. And unless the financial community is willing to change ….. advisors, as they are today will be extinct in five years.

Advisors who want to survive will have to do a lot more than just manage money – they will have to provide genuine “advice”.  That means doing what’s right for the client, not pushing product and pretending it’s advice.

Women especially, but all investors generally, are becoming more and more cynical. They says, “If I want advice about reducing my debt, that’s what I want and not ‘here’s more debt’ because that’s what my advisor gets paid for! And if saving taxes is what I want then saving taxes should take precedent over selling me a product.”

You may be thinking that spending your time providing advice isn’t lucrative but the reality is that in the long run – it pays off in spades. The advisors who take the time to build real relationships with clients, who provide advice as it relates to their clients’ lives, even when there is no immediate financial benefit to themselves, those who don’t simply push product – are the ones who over time have the most successful practices.

Generally women understand and value service, but they will say, “If I’m paying, I want to know what I’m paying for: Is it for returns? Is it for advice? Is it for administration? I want to know. Then I can make up my mind what’s worth it and what isn’t.”

Investing is becoming a commoditized business and technology is replacing research that no one else can find. Today the average advisor is hard pressed to consistently beat the markets, and with women emerging as the client of the future, unless they start providing real advice, their jobs will likely be extinct in five years.

Learn how to Retain Female Clients through this online course and earn CE credits. Or visit us at here and learn everything there is to know about what women want and how to serve them well.

Strategy Marketing
Marketing to Women
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Paulette Filion and Judy Paradi are partners at Strategy Marketing and have run their own businesses for more than 20 years. Paulette is an expert in financial services and Ju ... Click for full bio