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How to Influence Decisions to Your Favor

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The stereotype decision-maker can make our lives difficult and put us out of favor. The worst is when some choose to intimidate salespeople. What most vendors overlook is widening their perspective of who can influence decisions to their favor.

Successful selling is dependent upon kindness and respect for all.

Below are four brief snippets of corporate influence experiences. Underneath are the personal scenarios.  Most are taken by surprise when they hear that sales processes apply to everyday circumstances for resolving problems.

Four Corporate Scenarios Turning Favor:

#1 Purchasing Manager Relinquishes Authority

Most people would not have been willing to drive to a scary part of town. Nor would they have wanted to walk alone, down a long alley, to the sound of barking dogs.

Arriving at the garage, I found the people in charge of repairing old business equipment. Our friendly conversation was later relayed to the Purchasing Manager. It was also revealed that they were made to feel like royalty.  Within a month, I became the primary vendor for the entire campus.

#2 Multiple Vice Presidents Give Away Control

The gentleman in the basement accepted my invitation to have a chauffeured car drive him to a product launch. By the end, his spirit was elevated to the top floor. As he returned to the office, he instructed the executives to give my company the contract.

#3 Workers in the Trailer Recommend…

Buyers at internationally known construction companies spent time with me due to recommendations from the people working in their trailers. The congenial conversations led to my becoming known as ‘an order taker.’

#4 The Guard with Guns Shed Tears

Upon my wishing the guard a ‘Happy Halloween!’ and handing him a miniature candy bar, he stopped in his tracks. He reversed his thought. I was permitted entry to the company to earn business.

Moral of the Corporate Stories:

The way you treat someone determines how far you will advance.

All of the above experiences are examples for similar outcomes to occur in our personal life.

Three Personal Scenarios Turning Favor:

#1. Reservations Needed for the New Museum

Admitting to a guard that I had no idea reservations were needed for entry, she provided me with her free ticket. It was a complete surprise and a wonderful tour!

#2. Acknowledge Everyone in e-Mail

I was reprimanded as a new volunteer for mentioning my books and business. After the incident, the same person included the senior level people in his email to me.

I respectfully thanked him for his time while setting up a meeting with the higher-ups. By the end of our conversation, the executives happily accepted all of my marketing materials. They also elevated the capacity of how I will be able to volunteer.

#3. The Board Put the Decision on Hold

We have to accept that technology continually moves forward. Some people refuse to think about the advantage of solar energy or the idea of a driverless car. Those more willing to embrace the new need to find ways to help advance momentum in their communities.

In my community, the topic of installing electric charging stations for cars was put on hold, indefinitely. However, those with deposits on new vehicles are concerned about the lack of leadership.

I took it upon myself to contact Tesla and ask for suggestions on getting started. The right person agreed to speak to our Community Manager. Now we are on track for moving forward.

In every situation, we need to be alert to our intended outcome. When one path is blocked, seek out another. There are no totem poles of importance. When one person declines participation, find the one who will actively help.

Quitting is never the answer. A keen focus on finding the person willing to help influence a decision in your favor makes all the difference and the time spent worthwhile.

Speaking respectfully with many produces more frequent and significant sales.

‘Low-hanging fruit’ is the term sales trainers and management use to describe the effort of most salespeople. In other words, they only do what appears to be easy. Any prospect that seems to require extra work, will see the reps retreat.

How do you rate yourself on the motivation meter?
Do You:
  • Only seek out the low hanging fruit
  • Attempt to find alternate routes to get in the door
  • Continue to persevere and try creative strategies?

There is a reason for the expression, ‘reach for the stars.’ Should you not quite make the star, you will at least land high. And if you fall on flat land, that’s okay, as long as you are willing to get up and try again.

Quick hits in business and career are a rarity. For some, the learning is a lifetime journey.

Take the challenge to improve communication with everyone you encounter. Listen, observe, ask questions, and then speak. Be respectful of strange sounding ideas or those of opposing viewpoints.

Moral of the Personal Stories:
The open-minded are more likely to find new opportunities both in business and life.
Sales Tips for Decisions to Your Favor
  1. When told to leave the premises be respectful
  2. Whenever possible ask who makes the decision in regard to…
  3. Reconsider the varying personnel in the company for others to contact
  4. Thank a person for picking up the phone and then ask if they are in charge of…
  5. Conduct friendly conversations with everyone you encounter
  6. Omit the totem pole syndrome; each person is capable of making decisions
  7. Every step of the way, thank people for their time
  8. Before each holiday inquire about the other person’s plans
  9. After a holiday ask about their time away
  10. Celebrate Success!
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