Financial Paperwork and Information Your Elderly Parents Should Have On Hand

Financial Paperwork and Information Your Elderly Parents Should Have On Hand

Your elderly parents need help keeping their financial paperwork in order.
 

You want to help, but you don't know what information you need to have and where to keep it.

To help us understand how to help elderly parents with their financial paperwork, we contacted Dr. Cathleen V. Carr. She holds a doctorate in regenerative medicine, is a lawyer, lifetime caregiver, and the founder and Executive Director of CertifiedCare

Q: Many elderly parents are reluctant to involve their adult children in their finances. How can a caregiver tactfully find out what financial records exist and where they're stored?

Dr. Carr: Keep in mind that previous generations are taught to keep their financial information private. Simply start by casually talking about your concerns and the issues you want to discuss. Gently, ask them if they have given any of their financial affairs thought and if they have any preferences about how their resources are managed in the event they are unable to make those decisions themselves.

Q: What financial documents are essential for parents and caregivers to have?

Dr. Carr: 

A Living Will - If you want to be certain that your elders' wishes about medical treatment are followed even if he/she becomes incompetent, make sure that they put those wishes in writing, using a living will. 

A Durable or Springing Power of Attorney (POA) - A document that specifies who will be in charge of your elders' affairs should he or she become incompetent. The durable POA is in effect and force upon terms contained within the POA and those powers continue even after incompetence. 

An Advance Directive - A document that allows you to declare your preferences for end of life care, such as whether or not life support can be used, etc.

A Will - For distribution of the estate after death in according to the descendants wishes.

Q: Where should originals of important financial documents be kept?

Dr. Carr: Original Advance Directives, Healthcare POAs and Living Wills should be given to the physician or local hospital most likely to provide care. The original financial documents should be held by an Attorney or filed with the county Probate Court. Only leave originals in a home safe if someone in addition to the elder has the combination to it.

Q: Do any of the documents become more important if your parents become incapacitated? Do any documents become ineffective?

Dr. Carr: All of them become more important if the elder becomes incapacitated. They are designed for that circumstance. The Will is the only one that only becomes effective only after death, after the others are no longer are relevant.

Carol Marak
Aging
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Carol Marak earned a Fundamentals of Gerontology Certificate from the USC Davis School of Gerontology and advocates on behalf of older adults and family caregivers. She simpli ... Click for full bio

Solving Your Biggest Client Issue May Be at Your Fingertips

Solving Your Biggest Client Issue May Be at Your Fingertips

Written by: Shileen Weber

When the American Funds’ Capital Group  asked 400 advisors last year to name the biggest issues they face in their businesses, it wasn’t the DOL, market uncertainty or the economy that sat in the center of the idea cloud of answers.

It was client issues.

At a time when regulatory concerns and market turbulence would seem to be at all-time highs, the advisors who answered the survey were most concerned about servicing their clients as well as ways to find new ones and grow their businesses.

It’s one of the ironies of the business, that the things most people find so hard to manage – creating financial plans, managing assets and staying ahead of events – are what advisors find to be the easiest parts of the business. Marketing - the business of selling themselves – can be the area advisors find the hardest elements to master.

In this age of instant communication, it can be even more intimidating to market your practice, especially to younger clients for whom many traditional methods like newsletters, postcards and phone calls don’t work anymore. For them, email is the preferred way to get information, and, if it’s important, they are more likely to respond to texts, not phone calls.

But, it doesn’t have to be that hard. The digital age gives you access to ideas and content of all kinds you can use to touch your clients in a way that positions you as a valuable resource. The key is to keep it simple, stick to some basics and create consistent outreach that clients and potential clients are interested in and will appreciate you sharing with them.

Here is a common-sense approach you can take that will not require you to hire an expensive agency or take valuable time away from managing your clients’ assets and running your business.

Content is King


Create a content calendar for the year: Think about reasons to touch a client 13 times during the year – that can be once a month and on their birthday. (The common rule of sales is that it takes at least 7-13 touches to make a connection.) The number is limited and keeps you from inundating the clients who likely already feel inundated with content. You can take the seasonal approach – tax planning in the fall, January for account review content, college financing in the spring – and supplement it with topical events during the year. Creating a calendar will help you stick to a plan. Here’s one resource for a content calendar.

Review what content is already available to you:  Basically, this means finding the resources you already have and determining what pieces will be most valuable to your clients. Start first by checking out content your broker-dealer already generates that you can personalize. Many firms have economists who write regularly about the market. That’s content you can pass along to keep clients up-to-date they would not have access to anywhere else. In addition to your broker-dealer, mutual funds, your clearing firm, and money managers are all excellent sources of informative and even analytical content.

Personalize the content you use: Add your name, the client’s name or some way to avoid making it feel like canned content that you are using just to check the outreach box. See what capabilities your email program may have to help you.

Related: What's an Investor to Do When History Doesn't Repeat Itself?

The birthday strategy: One advisor used clients’ birthdays in a new way. Instead of the card or lunch date, the advisor asked the client’s spouse for a list of friends he could invite to a birthday lunch and made it a memorable event that was also a soft approach to getting referrals.

Become a curator of good content: What your review will show you is that you don’t have to generate the content yourself. You can point clients to pieces you find insightful. You are likely already doing this every day just to keep yourself informed. The next step is to compile it and send out the very best pieces to your clients, again, with a note with your own thoughts about why you found it valuable.

Find out what is working and do more of it: Use your client interactions, in-person and online, to find out what types of content clients liked and any they didn’t. You can use tracking on your emails to see how many were opened as a measurement tool, but the personal interactions tend to provide more insight than raw data.

Be disciplined about your execution: Get help from an office assistant or schedule the time each month to do the content development and outreach. As any good strategy, if you make it a habit, it won’t seem so hard.

Most importantly, be yourself and be personal: You may want to regularly get personal by talking about your family and hobbies. The ultimate is if you can provide content that is personal to your clients, not just about their investments – they get that from their statements, apps and online portals. Think alma maters, hobbies, children and parents.

Of course, as a disclaimer, you have to make sure all content and communications are complying with regulations and the rules of your own broker-dealer.

The process of creating a plan will get you thinking about your clients in a new way. That exercise alone can re-energize your business and get you seeing marketing opportunities in places you may never have seen them before.

Shileen Weber is Senior Vice President of Marketing and Communications at GWG Holdings. She was previously Director of Online Strategy and Client Experience at RBC Wealth Management, where they placed first in two JD Power and Associates U.S. Full Service Investor Satisfaction Study (2011 and 2013).
GWG Holdings, Inc.
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GWG Holdings, Inc. (Nasdaq:GWGH) the parent company of GWG Life, is a financial services company committed to transforming the life insurance industry through disruptive and i ... Click for full bio