Customers Buying Habits Are Changing. Adapt or Watch Your Business Die

Customers Buying Habits Are Changing. Adapt or Watch Your Business Die

Every day I get an email from RetailWire.com, a daily publication that is read by thousands of people in the retail industry. It’s the number one forum for discussions about hundreds of important issues in the industry. Now, before we go further, even though RetailWire.com focuses on the retail industry, what I’m about to share is relevant to every business in every industry.

A recent article in RetailWire posed a question about virtual reality and if it will make brick-and-mortar stores less relevant. By the way, if you haven’t experienced virtual reality, you must. It’s incredible. You put on what looks like goggles and you see the most amazing three dimensional images and videos. Okay, back to answering the question. My response was that virtual reality and augmented reality are just enhanced ways of viewing and experiencing products online. Yes, it will change the way people shop online, but it’s still “virtual.” It’s not real! You can’t touch the material to determine the quality of the suit or dress you’re looking at through a virtual reality headset. You can’t try it on either. So, how could this technology make physical stores less relevant?

The discussion of physical stores becoming irrelevant has been a topic of conversation for years. The first online purchase was made in 1994. According to a video produced by Shopify, an online shopping software program, the first online transaction was on August 11, 1994 through Dan Kohn’s online startup company when a friend bought a Sting CD over the internet. People said this kind of business would never work. People would never buy online. Well, never say never. Shortly after that Amazon came into the picture. And, here we are today.

Adobe’s research claimed last year’s Black Friday’s online sales were over $3 billion. And Cyber Monday’s sales, just three days later were also over $3 billion. Forrester predicts that by the year 2020, just three years from now, online sales will exceed $523 billion!

So, should retailers be scared? Maybe… because some retailers aren’t willing to change. And there are companies in virtually any industry that aren’t willing to change either. So, here is the lesson:

Business – in all industries – is changing. The old saying is true: The only thing that is consistent is change. So, get used to it.

Will online stores kill physical stores?

Did ATM’s eliminate bank tellers?

Did “Video Kill the Radio Star” when MTV went live back in 1981?

The answers are no, no and no!

Maybe the consumer is migrating to do more shopping online. It may make a physical store a little less “relevant” – but it doesn’t make the retailer less relevant! A retailer, as anyone or any company in business, must adjust and change. What makes a retailer less relevant won’t be because sales are moving from in-store to online. It will be because the retailer doesn’t adapt to the way their customers want to buy. And, it’s the same for any business. Your customers buying habits are changing. Adapt or watch your business die a slow and painful death. You must be willing to change as your customer’s change.

Shep Hyken
Client Experience
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Shep Hyken is a customer experience expert and the Chief Amazement Officer of Shepard Presentations. He is a New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling author and ... Click for full bio

How to Introduce and Position Yourself the Right Way

How to Introduce and Position Yourself the Right Way

Introducing yourself – more to getting it right than you think!


What do you say when someone asks you “so what do you do?”

You might say, “I’m a financial advisor”. Or “I’m an investment advisor”. If you’re a top advisor, you might be compelled to say “I’m Vice President and Portfolio Manager”. Or even “I’m a CFA”.

Well put all of those away if you’re introducing yourself to a woman you might want as a client. None of the above will impress her – she might even “run for the door” thinking you’re going to try to “sell” her something.

Your goal is have her say “tell me more about that”.

So what do you say?

Here are 4 quick tips:

  1. Make it about your clients
  2. Make it about outcomes
  3. Make it interesting
  4. Make it fun
     

How about something like this: “I help people have their cake and eat it too”.  Doesn’t that beg the question “what does that mean” or “how do you do that”.

Okay maybe that’s a bit over the edge but it’s important you make it about the people you help and not about what you do to help people get there.

Related: Turning a Female Prospect Into a Client

Try this:

I help <type of people you serve”> <achieve this>. Something like:

  • I help retirees create a sustainable income.
  • I help women understand money on their terms.
  • I help young couples get a good start towards financial security.
     

Now you try it! Send us your best one.

Find more resources and follow us through our website www.strategymarketing.ca

 

 

Strategy Marketing
Marketing to Women
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Paulette Filion and Judy Paradi are partners at Strategy Marketing and have run their own businesses for more than 20 years. Paulette is an expert in financial services and Ju ... Click for full bio