Staying in the Know On-the-Go With These 5 Marketing Podcasts

Staying in the Know On-the-Go With These 5 Marketing Podcasts

Written by: Olivia Carroll

The rapid pace of digital marketing leaves little time for lunch, let alone time to keep up on industry trends. Our secret weapon for staying in the know on-the-go? Podcasts.

Podcasts are an excellent (and did we mention, free) way to learn about practically anything, including marketing. They’re an excellent way to expand your horizons and learn from experts you wouldn’t normally cross paths with. Plus, podcasts can accompany you anywhere you go – on your commute, at the gym, in the kitchen – so you can tune in when it’s most convenient for you.

The hardest part is deciding what to listen to first. Picking a new podcast can feel like choosing a show to binge watch, so we’ve gone ahead and done the heavy lifting for you. Here are some of the best marketing podcasts in the game. (Trust us, these shows will make you wish you had a longer commute.)

1. WSJ MEDIA MIX
 

Hosted by: Jack Marshall and Steven Perlberg

In this podcast you’ll find: All things media. Social, TV, political, even food media! This dynamic podcast focuses on marketing and media for today’s CMO through a thought-provoking evaluation of the industry in interviews with experts in the field.

Topics include: Pokémon Go, TV’s shift to digital, advertising transparency, CNN’s plans to cover the Trump administration, and Silicon Valley inside stories

Listen now: WSJ Media Mix

2. THE MARKETING COMPANION PODCAST
 

Hosted by: Mark Schaefer & Tom Webster

In this podcast you’ll find: Comedic rhetoric to break down cutting-edge marketing insights. This podcast hilariously delivers acclaimed episodes that highlight their talents as authors, consultants, researchers, and bloggers.

Topics include: Gig economy and controversial marketing, content marketing FOMO, how to create a winning strategy with crappy content, and the true goal of influence

Listen now: Marketing Companion Podcast 

3. THE BOAGWORLD WEB DESIGN SHOW
 

Hosted by: Paul Boag and Marcus Lillington

In this podcast you’ll find: A British perspective on web design with content for designers, developers and website owners. This unique show provides listeners with a wide range of entertaining episodes centered around design topics. 

Topics include: User experience design, building sites for ROI, awesome apps and terrific tools, and overcoming digital management problems

Listen now: The Boagworld Web Design Show

4. THE MARKETING BOOK PODCAST
 

Hosted by: Douglass Burnett

In this podcast you’ll find: Interviews with best-selling authors on topics like social media, digital marketing, sales, B2B marketing, content marketing, and inbound marketing.

Topics include: Unmarketing, what customers crave, how to sell with a story, content chemistry, and how the ego is the enemy

Listen now: The Marketing Book Podcast

5. MARKETING OVER COFFEE
 

Hosted by: John Wall and Christopher Penn

In this podcast you’ll find: Quick 20 minute episodes recorded every week in a coffee shop. With a fusion of classic and new marketing, they give listeners quick marketing tips and tricks, presented in a casual conversational way.

Topics Include: Robot store, FrankenPhone returns!, hai karate and cake, math crimes against humanity, and 50 shades of marketing

Listen now: Marketing Over Coffee

Shawn Herring
Marketing
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A dynamic and enthusiastic leader, Shawn built and managed the global demand generation team at ExactTarget, increasing ROI from programs across all marketing channels (paid, ... Click for full bio

Solving Your Biggest Client Issue May Be at Your Fingertips

Solving Your Biggest Client Issue May Be at Your Fingertips

Written by: Shileen Weber

When the American Funds’ Capital Group  asked 400 advisors last year to name the biggest issues they face in their businesses, it wasn’t the DOL, market uncertainty or the economy that sat in the center of the idea cloud of answers.

It was client issues.

At a time when regulatory concerns and market turbulence would seem to be at all-time highs, the advisors who answered the survey were most concerned about servicing their clients as well as ways to find new ones and grow their businesses.

It’s one of the ironies of the business, that the things most people find so hard to manage – creating financial plans, managing assets and staying ahead of events – are what advisors find to be the easiest parts of the business. Marketing - the business of selling themselves – can be the area advisors find the hardest elements to master.

In this age of instant communication, it can be even more intimidating to market your practice, especially to younger clients for whom many traditional methods like newsletters, postcards and phone calls don’t work anymore. For them, email is the preferred way to get information, and, if it’s important, they are more likely to respond to texts, not phone calls.

But, it doesn’t have to be that hard. The digital age gives you access to ideas and content of all kinds you can use to touch your clients in a way that positions you as a valuable resource. The key is to keep it simple, stick to some basics and create consistent outreach that clients and potential clients are interested in and will appreciate you sharing with them.

Here is a common-sense approach you can take that will not require you to hire an expensive agency or take valuable time away from managing your clients’ assets and running your business.

Content is King


Create a content calendar for the year: Think about reasons to touch a client 13 times during the year – that can be once a month and on their birthday. (The common rule of sales is that it takes at least 7-13 touches to make a connection.) The number is limited and keeps you from inundating the clients who likely already feel inundated with content. You can take the seasonal approach – tax planning in the fall, January for account review content, college financing in the spring – and supplement it with topical events during the year. Creating a calendar will help you stick to a plan. Here’s one resource for a content calendar.

Review what content is already available to you:  Basically, this means finding the resources you already have and determining what pieces will be most valuable to your clients. Start first by checking out content your broker-dealer already generates that you can personalize. Many firms have economists who write regularly about the market. That’s content you can pass along to keep clients up-to-date they would not have access to anywhere else. In addition to your broker-dealer, mutual funds, your clearing firm, and money managers are all excellent sources of informative and even analytical content.

Personalize the content you use: Add your name, the client’s name or some way to avoid making it feel like canned content that you are using just to check the outreach box. See what capabilities your email program may have to help you.

Related: What's an Investor to Do When History Doesn't Repeat Itself?

The birthday strategy: One advisor used clients’ birthdays in a new way. Instead of the card or lunch date, the advisor asked the client’s spouse for a list of friends he could invite to a birthday lunch and made it a memorable event that was also a soft approach to getting referrals.

Become a curator of good content: What your review will show you is that you don’t have to generate the content yourself. You can point clients to pieces you find insightful. You are likely already doing this every day just to keep yourself informed. The next step is to compile it and send out the very best pieces to your clients, again, with a note with your own thoughts about why you found it valuable.

Find out what is working and do more of it: Use your client interactions, in-person and online, to find out what types of content clients liked and any they didn’t. You can use tracking on your emails to see how many were opened as a measurement tool, but the personal interactions tend to provide more insight than raw data.

Be disciplined about your execution: Get help from an office assistant or schedule the time each month to do the content development and outreach. As any good strategy, if you make it a habit, it won’t seem so hard.

Most importantly, be yourself and be personal: You may want to regularly get personal by talking about your family and hobbies. The ultimate is if you can provide content that is personal to your clients, not just about their investments – they get that from their statements, apps and online portals. Think alma maters, hobbies, children and parents.

Of course, as a disclaimer, you have to make sure all content and communications are complying with regulations and the rules of your own broker-dealer.

The process of creating a plan will get you thinking about your clients in a new way. That exercise alone can re-energize your business and get you seeing marketing opportunities in places you may never have seen them before.

Shileen Weber is Senior Vice President of Marketing and Communications at GWG Holdings. She was previously Director of Online Strategy and Client Experience at RBC Wealth Management, where they placed first in two JD Power and Associates U.S. Full Service Investor Satisfaction Study (2011 and 2013).
GWG Holdings, Inc.
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GWG Holdings, Inc. (Nasdaq:GWGH) the parent company of GWG Life, is a financial services company committed to transforming the life insurance industry through disruptive and i ... Click for full bio