20 Change Management Lessons from Working Over 20 years in Change

20 Change Management Lessons from Working Over 20 years in Change

Talk to almost anyone about change, and it immediately brings up feelings of stress.
 

We like to get comfortable in our routines. Yes, we stretch, we grow, but at a pace that feels, well, convenient because we’re in control. Thriving when we’re out of control is a much tougher prospect; it takes us out of our sweet spot on our way to discover what we hope will be a new cozy place.

The bottom line to successful change, whether personal or organizational, is it requires change management. Winging it will take you somewhere, all change does, but it may not be where you want, or intend, to go.

Out of undergrad, I was hired as a change management consultant and never looked back. Since then, I’ve not only focused on organizational change but began to research and understand what creates change for each one of us as an individual.

Poor reception for some early change management programs I supported taught me that change management is not the same as project management. Early on, most of my change management experience was related to IT change. Successfully cutover from one system to the new system and boom – change management. Um, no.Unfortunately, that thinking glossed over the magic that would make the change stick and avoid pissing of critical employees along the way. Project management is about process and at its heart, change management is about people. 

20 Change Management Lessons from Working Over 20 years in Change
 

1. Organizational change management has three key aspects: Sponsorship (who is sponsoring the change? Make sure they are active, visible supporters.), Training (what do I need to know/do differently after the change), Communications (2-way during, before and after the change). You need to consider all of these pieces in a successful change program.

2. Identify a sponsor who has influence. If the sponsor does not have the necessary influence both up and down the chain, but instead is given the responsibility without authority, the change program is doomed from the start.

3. Conference calls can and should be a part of the communication strategy, but you need to go to where the people are too. The impact of looking eye to eye is hard to replace with a conference call. Besides, what do you do on a conference call? Check your phone, email, Candy Crush? Yeah. Most other people on the call are doing that too. Get out from behind your desk already.

4. A feedback box in the break room only works if you respond to people’s concerns. Addressing issues without telling people they’ve been addressed is not very useful.

5. Change management communication is more than just PR. It’s not a one-way deal. You need to create forums where you can listen to people’s concerns and respond. If you don’t have a firm answer, “I hear you” and “I’ll find out” or “I’ll figure it out and get back to you” works wonders.

6. You need to trust your employees. Give them opportunities to get together and talk about the changes even when you’re not in the room facilitating (i.e., controlling the situation). Make time to meet with them afterward and hear about their concerns, ideas and suggestions.

7. Don’t be afraid of implementing recommendations that come from the team to support the change. If your change management efforts consist of a bunch of senior leaders who lock themselves in a room for endless meetings and to solve every problem… it’s time for a change.

8. When your change requires the team to learn new skills, give them multiple ways to acquire the skills. A mix of job aids that can be posted in their workspace, live training events, webinars and online training are likely necessary. Change and learning are not one size fit all.

9. Remove other options. I know that this sounds harsh but if you’re asking people to change the way they live and work, but they can still do the same thing they’ve always done, and it works, do you think they’ll change? No, me neither. This applies to both organizational and personal change.

10. Be a stickler for the process. You may feel like a jerk, but new procedures, systems, processes, ways of working take time to be adopted. Training is not a magic switch; it’s only a single component of the overall change management solution.

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Alli Polin
Personal Development
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Alli Polin, CPCC, ACC, is a former senior executive with deep experience in leadership, change management, and organization development. Now a writer, coach, and speaker, she ... Click for full bio

How to Introduce and Position Yourself the Right Way

How to Introduce and Position Yourself the Right Way

Introducing yourself – more to getting it right than you think!


What do you say when someone asks you “so what do you do?”

You might say, “I’m a financial advisor”. Or “I’m an investment advisor”. If you’re a top advisor, you might be compelled to say “I’m Vice President and Portfolio Manager”. Or even “I’m a CFA”.

Well put all of those away if you’re introducing yourself to a woman you might want as a client. None of the above will impress her – she might even “run for the door” thinking you’re going to try to “sell” her something.

Your goal is have her say “tell me more about that”.

So what do you say?

Here are 4 quick tips:

  1. Make it about your clients
  2. Make it about outcomes
  3. Make it interesting
  4. Make it fun
     

How about something like this: “I help people have their cake and eat it too”.  Doesn’t that beg the question “what does that mean” or “how do you do that”.

Okay maybe that’s a bit over the edge but it’s important you make it about the people you help and not about what you do to help people get there.

Related: Turning a Female Prospect Into a Client

Try this:

I help <type of people you serve”> <achieve this>. Something like:

  • I help retirees create a sustainable income.
  • I help women understand money on their terms.
  • I help young couples get a good start towards financial security.
     

Now you try it! Send us your best one.

Find more resources and follow us through our website www.strategymarketing.ca

 

 

Strategy Marketing
Marketing to Women
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Paulette Filion and Judy Paradi are partners at Strategy Marketing and have run their own businesses for more than 20 years. Paulette is an expert in financial services and Ju ... Click for full bio