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Seminars for Women: 10 Do’s and Don’ts

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Seminars for Women: 10 Do’s and Don’ts
  1. Don’t call it a seminar, for most women a seminar is long, boring and tedious. DO call it an EVENT which sounds more festive, exciting and lively.
     
  2. Don’t serve a heavy meal especially for women. Do be sure you have a decadent dessert (chocolate) and coffee this will help keep your guests there longer conversing with others.
     
  3. Don’t have participants seat themselves you lose all control over the situation. Do have assigned seats for each person this allows you to strategically position a hot prospect next to a raving fan.
     
  4. Don’t sit apart from your guests, this widens the divide between you and your potential prospects. Do sit at the table and create conversation with all your guests prior to, during and after the presentation even if you are the presenter.
     
  5. Don’t make it difficult for the participants to speak with each other. Do have name tags for each participant and introduce each participant to another guest in the room this helps get people engaging.
     
  6. Don’t start by introducing yourself and your team (typical and boring). Do start by welcoming everyone and then launch into a personal story before introducing yourself formally.
     
  7. Don’t use a power point with lots’ of verbiage and stand up front telling the participants what you think they need to know. Do ask lot’s of open ended questionsoften answering their questions by throwing it back to the audience this stimulates conversation and positions you as an advisor who truly engages his female clients.
     
  8. Don’t launch right into the educational portion of your presentation. Do introduce a quiz or a game that get’s all the participants engaged then tie the game into the purpose for the presentation.
     
  9. Don’t assume the participants will sign up for an appointment with you. Do have a clearly defined “next step” that entices the audience to meet with you, focus on what the meeting would DO for them.
     
  10. Don’t call to thank the participants for coming; would Tony Robbins call and thank you? Do call to tell them (enthusiastically) how pleased you were to see themat your event and ask, “What was the most compelling part of the presentation for you?”
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