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Calls to Action: Does Your Web Copy Follow These 3 Ideas?

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Calls to Action Does Your Web Copy Implement These 3 Ideas

Last week we shared some simple – and extremely effective – ways to improve your web copy.

Today’s post about calls to action is equally important, not just for your web copy but for all of your results-focused writing.

Here are three ideas to help you write better calls to action:

1. Abandon “want more” and “learn more”
 

These are the easiest ways to start calls to action. And while there is nothing wrong with them, there are better alternatives. Choose verbs that have strong, clear actions.

Here are some examples:

  • Choose
  • Protect your
  • Boost
  • Find a
  • Explore
  • Build
  • Create
  • Lead
  • Discover
  • Click
  • Craft
  • Achieve
  • Reach
  • Overcome
  • Sign up
  • Download

There are plenty more but you get the point.

2. You can – and should – have more than one call to action
 

Direct your readers to blog posts, brochures, calculators and whatever else you can. Calls to action are one of the greatest ways to continue and expand the conversation, as well as add more value.

In a brochure, consider having a call to action on every page. On a website, you can write in-line calls to action or include them as sidebars and call outs.

3. Use them to answer potential questions
 

Generally, calls to action answer just one question, “What do I do next?”

But they can answer any number of questions. What questions/objections could your readers have? You can also use your calls to action to answer questions and overcome objections.

For example, if you are writing about the cost of retirement, you reader may ask, “How did they come up with that number?” Answer your reader with a call to action that points to a retirement savings calculator. It could look like this: How much will you need in retirement? Check out our retirement calculator today and discover how much you’ll need.

The best way to find out what you need is to put yourself in your readers’ shoes. If you have more resources to help them or more answers that they may be looking for, use a call to action to help them take the next step.

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